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All The Air Matters

Another high efficiency furnace installation by Verne & Ellsworth Hann and another customer who is happy with the quality of his new system as well as the professionalism used during the project. But what is the gray material on the supply ductwork on the right? We are getting that question more frequently. And it all has to do with efficiency and the building code enforced by the municipality in which you live.

As national building codes become more diligent about efficiency in all phases of homebuilding additional scrutiny is given to even the smallest facets. In this particular case the focus is on even the most minimal air leakage from the return air ducts to the furnace. In essence, if every seam and connection of the return ductwork in completely sealed, then there will be no air drawn in from the basement. The system becomes more efficient. Efficiency translates into less energy consumed and more energy dollars saved.

Most energy-conscious and code abiding installers seal ducts with a gray mastic. Gray because it’s close in color to sheet metal. Mastic is a pliable material that goes on soft and then hardens. it’s applied liberally in order to ensure it gets worked into all of the air gaps in the seams and joints.

To be clear, National Building Standards are often adopted by state building codes which, in turn are adopted by local municipalities. Not all municipalities enforce all of the codes. That is up to the discretion of that particular building department.

But, as the push towards greater efficiency increases, more municipalities are demanding compliance from the contractors who perform work in their cities.

Verne & Ellsworth Hann is up to speed with all of the building codes in all of the municipalities in which we work. As an educated consumer seeking multiple estimates for a new HVAC project, you need to be asking your contractor about his code compliance awareness and history.

For a more detailed reading of the building code as adopted from the Ohio Mechanical Code by the Board of Building Standards you can read the complete code standard chapter 4101:8-16-01 on Duct Systems here. Paying particular attention to  sections 1601.4.1 through 1601.4.7 on joints and seams.

That’s a lot of detailed information to digest in order to understand why the installer is painting a gray substance onto the new ductwork  of your new high efficiency furnace.

But rest assured that Verne & Ellsworth is familiar with all codes in all municipalities.

 

What People Are Saying

  • Well done, as always.

    - Jeff P.( Moreland Hills, Air Conditioning Installation, July 2018 )
  • I had an exceptional experience.  From office staff on the phone to Chris giving me a quote to the installers, everyone was polite, professional, and respectful.  I was treated as a responsible, knowledgeable homeowner and completely comfortable with the installers in my home. I absolutely made the right decision in hiring them to add central A/C to my home.

    - Julia B.( Cleveland Heights, Air Conditioning Installation, June 2018 )
  • We found the entire experience of working with Verne & Ellsworth Hann to be professional and our expectations for the work were exceeded.  We really appreciate your attention to detail and how thoroughly you completed the work.

    - Kirstan R.( Cleveland Heights, Furnace and Air Conditioning Installation, April 2018 )
  • You guys were amazing!  So happy with you and LOVE our new furnace!

    - Bill F.( Chagrin Falls, Furnace Installation, March 2018 )
  • Professional and courteous.  Fair and accurate estimate.  Great job guys!

    - Steve A.( Solon, Furnace Installation, March 2018 )